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Venture Capitalist - General Partner, Principle, Associate, Analyst

Summary

Venture Capital Partnerships are teams of investors who assess private companies and seek ownership positions in companies that when they go public or sold, will likely generate meaningful returns for investors.  Top tier funds seek annualized returns in the 20 to 25% range, though some funds can fail and return zero.   
Quick Facts: Venture Capital
2019 Pay Estimates 

Funds who raise $25 to $500M often charge investors 20% carry (20% of the returns after investors get their dollars back) and 2% annual management fee from amount raised.  Salaries vary according to operating costs, with the amount left unspent from annual operating costs divided among the partners.  

Entry-Level Education

Most Analysts enter from top tier universities.  Degrees are typically in Engineering, Data Analysis or Applied Sciences.  Associates have that experience as well, but also possess a Masters degree MBA or  PhD as well.  

Work Experience in a Related Occupation Analysts generally have a year or two of relevant work experience doing research and excel support in a top tier investment bank.  

Associates typically have 3 to 7 years of experience at an investment bank or Wall Street firm, operating experience in a leading technology company. 
On-the-job Training There are a couple of venture conferences specifically intended to train young venture professionals on term sheet writing, capital table calculations, and other relevant skills that get them up to speed more quickly, but these courses can be costly and vary in quality.  The best incites come from associates and analysts who have been in the job for a couple years already at the same or a different firm.  Or potentially from the Partners of a firm themselves.  
Number of Jobs, 2019 10,000
Job Outlook, 2019 to 2029

Hard to say.  Returns have not been good over the last decade and investors are finding new ways to enter private companies that have not previously existed.  And many institutional investors are now piling billions into brand name funds, even though these heretofore top tier return-yielding groups have no experience investing this amount of money.  But this is sucking dollars out of the air for other funds to aquire and invest, shrinking the market.  Many funds are going away.  That said, the blockchain is providing a new mechanism for companies to go public, assuming a free market returns to America or elsewhere, enabling globally oriented entrepreneurs to circumvent over reaching Government bureaucrats and find new ways to build value for themselves, their employees and their shareholders, with risk as each sees fit.  A perceptive set of new VC's may come to the fore.

Fund Investment Strategies  A typical $100M fund will focus in a particular segment such as early stage technology.  It will make initial investments of $2M to $5M across 8 to 10 companies reserving a total of $10M per company over the life of the fund.  Investors can return some amount of returns back into portfolio companies.  Top tier funds look to general 20 to 25% returns per annum to investors.

What Venture Capital Do

Venture Capitalists (VC’s) provide the funding for companies at various stages of growth, buying ownership positions of a company in order to yield higher returns for Institutional Portfolio Managers.  Once a VC has purchased a position in a company (i.e. buying 10% to 50% of the equity of a company) a partner from the firm typically takes a Board Seat and works with the CEO to help support the continued growth and exit (sale or IPO) of the can. 

Work Environment

Venture Capitalists typically have Class A offices overlooking beautiful office parks, although the successful partners in the firms spend most of their time out on the road sourcing the most interesting opportunities with in large technology companies, from University spin-outs, or serial entrepreneurs.  Analysts and Associates typically spend more time in the office than the Partners, with a larger burden of completing the due diligence, term sheet writing and management sourcing as the Partners direct. Conference rooms are usually busy with partners bringing in new prospective investment opportunities or for continued due diligence on interesting deals, with Analysts and Associates joining these meetings to assess which companies the firm may invest.

How to Become a Venture Capital

Venture Capital partners typically come through two channels.   First and more likely, they are a successful entrepreneur or CEO who has proven themselves as strong operators with great market sense, able to compete in deeply technical or scientific environments building strong returns for investors.  The second set come through the ranks as young analysts or associates who rise over time, proving themselves as vital team members who eventually may serve as Principle, then a Junior Partner.  

Pay

Analysts who have no experience to two years of wall street experience can earn anywhere from $50,000 to $90,000 per year, while Associates can earn from $85,000 per year to $160,000.  There can be bonuses and other benefits as the Partnership and companies succeed. 

Salaries for Partners are generally dependent upon the size of the fund raised and how much of the operating expenses are spent on other employees and support.  It is not unheard of however for Partners to earn from $200,000 per year to in excess of a million dollars, depending upon the experience of the Partner and how many funds a Partnership may be managing.

Job Outlook

With volumes of regulation continuing to mount on Wall Street and many of the historically Venture interested Institutional investors struggling with returns (Banks, Insurance funds, State Pension Funds, University Endowments) it is hard to tell how the industry will play out over the coming years.  The historically high pay structures seems to be changing as more funds are having to prove themselves and return investor capital first before they participate in any upside.  Institutional investors are also pushing partnerships for new structures, for example set fees and salaries even for the partners, in order to manage some of the challenges that have been faced in recent years.  The industry, like Wall Street, remains in significant turmoil, with problems like Sarbanes Auxley enriching banks and the Fed's personal greed in pinning interest rates to the floor, distorting all kinds of banker and investor compensation schemes and scaling wasteful, massive overhead.  While the Trump administration's lowering of burdensome regulations and the natural acceleration of innovation in sciences and technology have helped, it is truly hard to predict how these markets and job opportunities will play out in the coming decades.

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Created by Successtrek,  2019

What Venture Capitalists Do

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Venture Capitalists have three primary responsibilities.  First they must raising the funds for which they hope to invest.  This can take months to years, depending on the experience and credibility of the team, and the prospective investor's read on the perceived opportunity. 

Secondly, they spend their time seeking and funding the best opportunities in their particular industry sector.  Some funds focus on technology, life sciences, early stage or late.  Once they make those investments, they spend a great deal of time supporting the companies at a Board level, assisting the CEO’s in achieving the planned milestones to grow value. Next, helping them to raise follow on rounds at higher valuations with the right co-investors.  Then eventually supporting the management in the process of a sale or IPO. 

The third major area of responsibility for the leaders of a venture fund is the management of investors, keeping them informed on Quarterly Reports and holding Annual Meetings.  A Partnership's Annual Meetings is typically a large
conference-like event where the CEO’s come in and speak to Limited Partners (a firms investors) taking them through the company's vision and progress made throughout the year.  

Typically in a set of ten companies in an early stage portfolio, top tier firms hope to achieve returns north of 20 to 25%.  This means that on a standard set of ten companies, roughly three may lose all to some of the money invested .  Another three companies may return their invested money back to investors.   And another three may generate one to five times the money invested…and one will hopefully return the value of the entire fund.  Not all money is returned in an exit immediately goes back to investors, as the partners may choose to recycle some of that cash back into the portfolio for support and further growth. 

Duties

Venture Capitalists typically do the following:

  • Source portfolio companies, bringing them in to meet the other Partners as diligence progresses, to get feedback on team members and the opportunity.
  • Spend lots of hours meeting companies and then conducting due diligence. This diligence can include assessing market viability, cost analysis, management back ground checks, and industry interest in the opportunity.
  • Study economic and business trends
  • Writing termsheets for prospective investee companies then working with lawyers to structure the investment documents and board governance. Creating Quarterly Reports on the performance of each company individually then assessments of the portfolio overall.
  • Coordinating Annual Meetings for all investors, coordinating the presentations of CEO and panels to help them understand the portfolio and potential for exit.
  • Assisting the CEO in setting fundable milestones, then fund raising upon them.
  • Seeking new or firing CEO’s in concert with the rest of the Board, in order to support the company’s most successful outcome.

Lots of time on the road giving investors updates as well as putting together fund raising presentations when Partnerships are raising new funds.

Venture Capitalist evaluate investment opportunities and work to seek the best opportunities to generate for investors the highest return.  While rare, some firms have had investments in startup companies that ultimately go public or get acquired as astronomical valuations that yield 100x returns.

Venture Capital funds generally have a few strategies they may choose to follow:

  • Early Stage
  • Late Stage, meaning pre-IPO funding
  • Life Science oriented
  • Technology oriented
  • Blockchain and Crypto Investment Funds
  • Regional Funds, as in Southern California, New York, India, or Japan
  • Both Life Science and Technology
  • Deep technology, oriented in a specific domain, such as Biopharma, IoT, Software only, Energy or Semiconductor.
  • Angel investments, meaning pre-venture round deals of roughly $250k to $1M through a group of investors

Venture Capital firms also generally focus on trends affecting a specific industry, geographical region, or type of product. For example, an analyst may focus on a subject area such as the energy industry, a world region such as Eastern Europe, or the foreign exchange market. They must understand how new regulations, policies, and political and economic trends may affect investments. Investing is becoming more global, and some Venture Capital firms specialize in a particular country or region. Companies want those Venture Capitalist they choose to understand the business environment in which they compete.

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Work Environment

Venture Capitalists review business plans to find ones where they would like to buy an owership position and then work with management to grow the company to a sale or IPO.  

Venture capital held about 10,000 jobs in 2019, and often have glamorous offices in which to impress the best engineers, scientists and entrepreneurs.  Good partners however spend less time in the office, and much time out meeting their portfolio leaders and new prospective opportunities, staying ahead of the competition.  Very rarely do investors invest in companies that are mailed to them over the transom.  The best opportunities typically come from speaking to executives at leading technology companies who have had some of their best people leave to begin new startups, or through highly regarded individuals advising entrepreneurs who call to refer them.  Smart entrepreneurs realize that a strong introduction is the best way to get a meeting at an office of a Venture Capital fund.



Work Schedule

80 hour work weeks are not uncommon, particularly for young analysts and associates who aggressively want to prove their worth and are enthused to now have access to the brightest technologists and scientists across the region they now work.  And with a never ending fount of highly competitive companies to assess and complete due diligence upon, the amount of reference calls to make and market assessments that must be completed can sometimes keep these individuals working through the weekend. Great partnerships have the Partners also deeply engaged throughout the nights and weekends, crafting emails to one another and seeking suggested individuals to assist in the assessment of the best opportunities.   Once a partnership has agreed to invest, the Partner and Associate craft a term sheet and then work with a local lawyer to structure the legal agreements upon which the company will close. 

Exiting a company can be an labor-intensive task, attempting to find a buyer and decide if the headcount and expenditures should be lowered to give enough time, or maintained to maximize the value of the sale.  Similarly, assisting management through the process of an IPO, preparing the required Government paper work, and supporting the team in road shows led by a set of wall street bankers, are all part of venture manager's job as they take a company from early investment to a Public company. 

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Created by Successtrek, 2019

How to Become a Venture Capitalist

Venture capitalists meet companies and consider the prospect of buying a percentage of the company and supporting it through exit, versus other opportunities which may provide higher returns at lower risks. At the end of the day, it is all about the profits and fund returns.  Little else.  Investors can then choose what to do with the money the venture capitalists have generated for them.

Venture Capital partners typically come through two channels.   First and more likely, they are a successful entrepreneur or CEO who has proven themselves as strong operators with great market sense, able to compete in deeply technical or scientific environments building strong returns for investors.  The second set come through the ranks as young analysts or associates who rise over time, proving themselves as vital team members who eventually may serve as Principle, then a Junior Partner.  

Education

Analysts typically have an engineering or sciences degree from a top university and a couple
couple years of Wall Street or Wall Street-like experience.  Associates, which are higher in pay and position relative to analysts, typically have a strong undergraduate degree of similar caliber to the analysts, and some form of Masters, many of whom have an MBA.  There are also a number of firms who hire an PhD or two, but these are probably a bit less common.

Licenses, Certifications and Registrations

While Government and it’s regulatory agencies are hungry to control much more of the private sector investing, both on qualification and “who is allowed to invest”, to date, they have fortunately not been successful in asserting themselves quite as strongly so far.  As they do, smart investors and VC’s look to relocate the jobs they create into regions and spaces where greater freedom of thought and operation are enabled.  

While some venture firms, especially those who have accepted Government money such as SBA’s, do have some type of accreditation they may have received, most do not.  One example of a certification that investors sometimes have is the Chartered venture Analyst (CFA) certification from the CFA Institute; but most partners in funds choose not to waste lots of time on such things nor do they seek younger professionals who have.  They do not generally indicate that a young investor has some of the incites nor knowledge needed to rapidly assess significant industry trends in fast emerging markets, and find the right opportunities and management to win.  Instead, day to day work among the partners and CEO’s of the companies help the younger professional develop more operating sense for the characteristics that make a winning investment.  And the partnership evaluates the Associate’s progress from there.

 Venture funds often hire a CFO with a CPA to management the overall finances of the fund, allowing the Partners to focus predominantly on the management of the portfolio companies themselves.  

Advancement

The ranks of an early stage venture firm, from lowest to highest, are typically:

  • Analyst
  • Associate
  • Principle
  • Junior Partner
  • General Partner
  • Managing Partner

There is typically not a CEO or individual who is most senior across a Partnership, with all of the Partners tasked with leading the firm cohesively together.  Even when a partner carries the title of Managing Partner, that often is carried by all the partners in the firm. Sometimes first have Venture Partners, who are often part time partners or partners tasked in leading a very specific set of investments in a fund, such as late stage or deep technology.  Most Analysts and Associates spin out into portfolio companies after a few years, while some may rise to a Principle or eventual Partner.   Some of that ability to ascend in the ranks can also be commensurate with the simple luck regarding the timing and support requirements of a new and larger fund.  General Partners often prefer the individual they know and have worked with, to the risk of bringing in people completely new.  

Additionally in venture funds, there are sometimes Venture Partners, who are partners who may be oriented in a very specific manner.  For example, they may be an in house CEO to lead companies when appropriate, or designated to lead investment in a particular sector such as software, networking or semiconductor.  Additionally, firms generally have a Director of Finance or Chief Financial Officer who is in charge of the finances, audits and investor relations.  And secondly there can be a Director of IT or Billing who assists in the management of the fund and support of the partnership
.  

Important Qualities

Analytical skills.  Venture capitalists must process a range of information in finding profitable investments.  They must have thorough due diligence skills and be adept at canvassing through large amounts of data to find the critical points in company or technology to help them assess whether an investment may prove worthy.  

Capable of influencing management, co-investors and a Board:   Venture Capitalists are not CEO's.  They do not run the company or a board, and must understand the difference.  Like the coach of a football team, their job is to advise and influence the quarterback and players, but not to do their job.  And unlike a coach of a football team, they do not call the plays for the CEO to run in the field. The CEO owns the strategy and seeks the board's support.  VC's are simply are a sounding board for strategy, resource management and goal prioritization.  Therefore, a venture capitalist must know how to influence these individuals when he wants to hire a new CEO, encourage management focus on a new market, or change their strategy for raising an appropriate round of capital.

Financing strategy knowledge.  Venture capitalists must be adept at understanding the investment climate, what firms are actively investing and how to influence the right partners to come into a deal.  They must be facile with capitalization tables and know how to advise CEOs and the board regarding appropriate funding milestones that will help a company achieve a follow round of financing, at a higher valuation. 

Harsh, surgeon like decision making ablities.   Venture capitalists must be willing to make hard calls, shutting down companies to prevent good money following bad, and letting CEO's go when they feel it is in the best interest of all shareholders.  Companies and CEO’s can burn capital.  Sometimes both must be cut quickly rather than allowed to continue draining the resources that a partnership or company may maintain.  While choosing to shut companies down, sell them for a loss or fire a CEO may seem ruthless at times, the inability to make these decisions in a timely manner can also stand to risk the value of the entire portfolio.

Capable of expressing their truth. Some firms and partnerships struggle with listening to one another and sharing what they perceive is the truth about a venture, leader or opportunity.  There can become a fear where if one partner insults a company that belongs to another, then there will be retribution when that partner's company comes back to the table and needs follow on financing.  Partnerships must always know that the entire portfolio belongs to the team of investors, and dollars must be allocated in a manner to maximize them.  Failure to do so is detrimental to the investors, the portfolio and the entire fund. 

Intuitive perspectives on market trends, people and opportunities.  Venture capitalists must be able to evaluate .  To be successful,  venture capitalists must be motivated to seek out obscure information that may be important to the investment. Many work independently and must have self-confidence in their judgment.

Quick Study.   Venture Capitalists are often generalists seeking specialists with expertise to assist them in assessing technology or sciences in a new emerging market.  They must be able to build rapport and have a sense for the right resources to use, while also being a strong self-study who can understand bottlenecks or technological breakthroughs, and find high quality technologies and scientists to help them reach investment decisions quickly.

Smart thinker, able to lay out a case for or against and objective, clearly and articulately.  Even the most sophisticated of technologies can be broken down into its most fundamental aspects, understandable by individuals who are reasonably educated and interested in knowing its unfair advantages.  Venture Capitalists must quickly get to the bottom of a value proposition and it’s position within a large market opportunity, assessing whether it will give a team an enduring unfair advantage in cost or performance.  Slow, unstructured thinkers and feeble-minded communicators - need not apply. 

Relentless work ethics and people of honorable character. The best venture capitalists display the kind of tenacity and effort that they expect to see from their best CEO’s.  And over the long run, trust among your partners, whether they be in your fund, a fellow venture firm, or your management team, is the most valuable tool of the trade.  There is little doubt when dealing with tens of millions of dollars and large egos abound, that your character will be tested in more ways than one.  Make the right decisions aligned with soul wisdom, and win or lose, you will never need to look back. 

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Created by Successtrek, 2019

Pay

Venture Capitalists

Median annual wages, 2019

Partners in small funds, $15M to $50M $150k to $300k 
Partners in medium to large funds$500k to >$1M/year
Analysts, 1-2 years of exp before prior$50,000 to $90,000/year
Associates and Principles, 1 to 5 yrs $90k to $250k/year

Salaries for Partners are generally dependent upon the size of the fund raised and how much of the operating expenses are spent on other employees and support.  Typical fund terms are that investors get their money back and then on the returns, general partners share with the investors 20% and the investors get 80%.   This is referred to as the carry.  There is also a 2% annual management fee to run the funds, so on a $100M fund, that is $2M per year to cover operating costs and management salaries.  So for example, if there were a couple of associates, an admin and offices expenses that totaled $500,000, that would leave $1.5M for the partners to divide as annualized salary, assuming two partners.  It is not unheard of for Partners to earn in from $200,000 per year to in excess of a million dollars, depending on how many funds a Partnership may be actively managing.  Funds often overlap, as they invest one and wait for it to mature as they invest the next.  And as companies are sold or go public, partnerships are generally able to return assets to the investors.  Most fund require investors to get their money back before partners participate in any of the returns.  

Analysts who have no experience to two years of wall street experience can earn anywhere from $50,000 to $90,000 per year, while Associates can earn from $85,000 per year to $160,000, and those who advance to Principle can make. $200k to $300k per year. Generally only partners serve on the boards of companies, though some Principles may do so also.  There can be bonuses and other benefits as the Partnership and its companies succeed for younger employees.  Typically if a Partnership is not expanding the size of the fund, after a couple years, analysts and associates either rotate off into other funds, or exit the partnership into a portfolio or industry company.  The experience of working in a fund typically gives everyone involved exposure to some of the most talented engineers, scientists and professionals in the industry, opening doors to many new opportunities from the fund.  

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Created by SuccessTrek, 2019
Image Job Summary Entry Level Education 2012 Median Pay
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Bachelor's degree
$68,150 per year
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Bachelor's degree
$51,850 per year
Budget analysts help public and private institutions organize their finances. They prepare budget reports and monitor institutional spending.
Bachelor's degree
$73,840 per year
Claims adjusters, appraisers, examiners, and investigators evaluate insurance claims. They decide whether an insurance company must pay a claim, and if so, how much.
$59,850 per year
$28.78 per hour
Compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists help conduct an organization’s compensation and benefits programs. They also evaluate job positions to determine details such as classification a
$59,090 per year
$28.41 per hour
Cost estimators collect and analyze data in order to estimate the time, money, materials, and labor required to manufacture a product, construct a building, or provide a service. They generally specia
Bachelor's degree
$61,790 per year
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Bachelor's degree
$81,760 per year
Financial examiners ensure compliance with laws governing financial institutions and transactions. They review balance sheets, evaluate the risk level of loans, and assess bank management.
Bachelor's degree
$79,280 per year
Fundraisers organize events and campaigns to raise money and other kinds of donations for an organization. They also may design promotional materials and increase awareness of an organization’s work
Bachelor's degree
$54,130 per year
Human resources specialists recruit, screen, interview, and place workers. They often handle other human resources work, such as those related to employee relations, payroll and benefits, and training
Bachelor's degree
$55,640 per year
$26.75 per hour
Insurance underwriters decide whether to provide insurance, and under what terms. They evaluate insurance applications and determine coverage amounts and premiums.
Bachelor's degree
$67,680 per year
Loan officers evaluate, authorize, or recommend approval of loan applications for people and businesses.
Bachelor's degree
$63,650 per year
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Bachelor's degree
$74,170 per year
Management analysts, often called management consultants, propose ways to improve an organization’s efficiency. They advise managers on how to make organizations more profitable through red
Bachelor's degree
$81,330 per year
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Bachelor's degree
$62,560 per year
Meeting, convention, and event planners coordinate all aspects of professional meetings and events. They choose meeting locations, arrange transportation, and coordinate other details.
$45,810 per year
$22.02 per hour
Personal financial advisors provide advice on investments, insurance, mortgages, college savings, estate planning, taxes, and retirement to help individuals manage their finances.
Bachelor's degree
$90,530 per year
Purchasing managers, buyers, and purchasing agents buy products for organizations to use or resell. They evaluate suppliers, negotiate contracts, and review product quality.
$60,550 per year
$29.11 per hour
Tax examiners and collectors, and revenue agents ensure that federal, state, and local governments get their tax money from businesses and citizens. They review tax returns, conduct audits, identify t
$50,440 per year
$24.25 per hour
Training and development specialists help plan, conduct, and administer programs that train employees and improve their skills and knowledge.
Bachelor's degree
$59,020 per year
Funds who raise $25 to $500M often charge investors 20% carry (20% of the returns after investors get their dollars
NA
Funds who raise $25 to $500M often charge investors 20% carry (20% of the returns after investors get their dollars
25000
Chief Financial Officer devise strategies and policies to ensure that an organization meets its goals. They plan, direct, and coordinate operational activities of companies and organizations.
20000
Chief Financial Officer devise strategies and policies to ensure that an organization meets its goals. They plan, direct, and coordinate operational activities of companies and organizations.
20000
Business Development team members are sales support partners generally tasked with structuring revenue generating partnership, marketing deals and other contracts that support revenue growth for the c
25000
Business Development team members are sales support partners generally tasked with structuring revenue generating partnership, marketing deals and other contracts that support revenue growth for the c
25000
Angel Investors work with their own capital, providing the funding for companies at various stages of growth, buying ownership positions of a company while coaching the leaders to the next stage of gr
250000
Angel Investors work with their own capital, providing the funding for companies at various stages of growth, buying ownership positions of a company while coaching the leaders to the next stage of gr
250000
Angel Investors work with their own capital, providing the funding for companies at various stages of growth, buying ownership positions of a company while coaching the leaders to the next stage of gr
250000
Angel Investors work with their own capital, providing the funding for companies at various stages of growth, buying ownership positions of a company while coaching the leaders to the next stage of gr
20000
Angel Investors work with their own capital, providing the funding for companies at various stages of growth, buying ownership positions of a company while coaching the leaders to the next stage of gr
Angel Investors work with their own capital, providing the funding for companies at various stages of growth, buying ownership positions of a company while coaching the leaders to the next stage of gr
Angel Investors work with their own capital, providing the funding for companies at various stages of growth, buying ownership positions of a company while coaching the leaders to the next stage of gr
Angel Investors work with their own capital, providing the funding for companies at various stages of growth, buying ownership positions of a company while coaching the leaders to the next stage of gr

Links to Additional Information

Venture Capital data on companies and funds:
https://www.pwc.com/us/en/industries/technology/moneytree.html
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